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Types of CTAs: The Ultimate Conversion Hustler’s Guide

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There are many different types of Ctas out there, as far as the eye can see.

But every Cta is not created equal, some CTA are better than others.

But what we do know is that you need to have at least one.


You could do a great job, exposing your product, even selling your product, but if you don’t actually ask for the sale or the action, you will never receive the sale or action.


We will discuss below some examples if the best CTAs out there.

Read on.

How Do You Write a Call to Action?

Before you write your call to action, determine the goal you’re trying to achieve:

Do you want to increase subscriptions?

Boost sales?

Move readers to another content piece?

Once you know what you want to do, you can think about how best to do it.

The best call to action phrases are brief and use strong verbs.

They speak directly to the user. Instead of weaker call to action words like click here, an effective call to action phrase example will use more specific words that speak directly to the desired outcome:

Discover your best life

Join our community

Book your next adventure.

Here’s a look at a few different CTAs.

call-to-action

In fact, NPR has great call to action examples all over their page. At the very top, a bright red button invites you to learn more about their car donation program. Just below that, a red heart (clearly implying you have one if you click) appears over the word “donate.”

In the white space below, NPR tells you that they are supported by listeners, and includes yet another link to make a donation.

All of these CTAs serve one purpose: to get people to donate money to them.

Traditional Call to Action Examples

First, let’s take a look at some examples of direct mail promotions from magazines.

Many of these are from magazines encouraging readers to start or renew a subscription. More specifically, they’re from the inserts that often fall out from within the pages while you’re reading, and look something like this:

traditional-call-to-action

As I was reviewing these direct mail promotions, I found three aspects that nearly all of them have in common. Some are more obvious than others in their execution, but all take a similar approach to driving action.

See if you notice them while you read through this line-up of old CTAs, and I’ll tell you my findings below.

Sales and Marketing Management Magazine

So if you were waiting for the perfect time to seize this opportunity, the time is now. Send for your free issue today.

Outside Magazine

Discover the exciting world of outside. Subscribe today.

Success Magazine

Get a taste of SUCCESS! Send me the form at the top of this letter, and I’ll send you the next issue of SUCCESS absolutely free.

Harpers Magazine

May I send you a free copy? There is no obligation attached to my offer… Please let me know if you’ll accept my offer by January 31.

House & Garden

So indulge—in so much excitement, for so little! Please take advantage of our “Summer White Sale” and save on a subscription to HG today.

Nothing too exciting, right?

To be honest, though, those were some of the more creative ones. The majority read like this:

Do mail your acceptance to me today.

So act right now. The postage is paid, and you’ve got nothing to lose but a great garden to gain!

SEND NO MONEY NOW! But please mail your card today!

So if you’re looking for knowledge, a rewarding adventure, and the advantage a future perspective can offer, mail the enclosed card today!

See the pattern?

A call to action is often the final instruction to a reader, so it makes sense that for similar products, that instruction is largely the same.

After all, when it comes down to it, each of these magazines needs readers to mail an “enclosed card” to earn a subscription.

So without that directive, it wouldn’t matter how well-written the rest of an ad’s copy was. Even if a recipient liked it, if they didn’t know to mail the card to subscribe, the campaign would be a waste.

Of course, this particular example is exclusive to print campaigns.

You’d never see a digital marketer requiring users to mail something to convert.

And I shudder to think of the abysmal conversion rates if they did.

Even so, there are three things that nearly all of the examples above include that are important for any call to action, regardless of format:

Glamour-call-to-action

A no-obligation statement that removes or reduces risk. In many cases, they’re asking for a free trial rather than a purchase. In other words, “try us, you’ll like us.” This gives people the confidence to buy.

All of them contain some version of “Mail your acceptance card.” This is simple usability. You have to tell people what to do next. Today, it would read, “Click the button below.”

Encouragement to respond right away. That’s standard direct response. Don’t give people an option to wait and think about it.

Together, these three elements make for a simple, straightforward request that requires little of the consumer.

And for most businesses, that’s pretty ideal.

Call to Action Examples

Ultimately, the name of the game, what separates the different types of Ctas, is conversions.

Conversions are the lifeblood of a business.

Without it, a business will die.

However, sometimes obtaining a high conversion rate can be hard.

Real hard.

But don’t give up, you to can enjoy the benefits that come with achieving higher conversions.

In summary, CTAs come in all different shapes and sizes, and because we appreciate all the CTAs and we don’t want to CTA shame any of them.

They are all beautiful in there own way.

Jokes aside, I hope some of the examples were able to get a couple of your brain cells firing, and ideas for various CTAs are beginning to flood your mind.

I know it hurts, your not used to it, but try to push through it, you will be OK.

Lol.

But seriously, I hope that you are able to convert as many new customers as possible for your business from henceforth.

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